Pastoral Care


Pastoral care is embedded in all aspects of life at John Paul College and is an integral factor in all academic studies. The wellbeing of all students is very important and pastoral care is central to the development and progress of our students. John Paul College is a Catholic College - all values are based on the Gospels and are recognised in our College motto of “Justice, Peace and Charity”. We strive for all students to grow both spirituality and emotionally in their social development in order for them to become more resilient, independent and confident students.

First and foremost is the House system; each student is allocated to a House and a Home Room. The Home Room teacher is the member of staff that the student will get to know in a more pastoral way, and students will be able to discuss any issues with their Home Room teacher.

The House Coordinator is in charge of the House and will work with the Home Room teacher with any concerns that students and parents may have.

John Paul College also offers the support of a Provisional Psychologist, Ms Rachel Silvini and a Chaplaincy worker, Mrs Carla van Heerden. Students can be referred to both of these services.

The Dean of Students is the staff member in charge of pastoral care. The House Coordinators, College Provisional Psychologist and Chaplaincy worker meet with Dean of Staff on a regular basis to ensure all students are coping with their academic studies and their social situation.

Pastoral Care is the shared responsibility of all stakeholders - parents, staff and students. Building relationships firstly within the Home Room, develops a sense of community, helps with resilience and a sense of belonging. When students feel they belong, they embrace life at high school with more confidence.

House System

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Clancy House

The crest of the Sisters of St John of God congregation shows a pomegranate set between two branches beneath a cross. The pomegranate is a symbol of charity because when the fruit is ripe the skin bursts open. The cross is a reminder that to love is to suffer as well as to give, while the branches are a sign of victory to those who have persevered.

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McAuley House

The 'Mercy Cross' was designed by Catherine McAuley and reflected her deep love for the crucified Jesus. The tradition of the Sisters of Mercy is that the body of Jesus is not shown on the Cross as each Sister places herself upon the Cross in union with Jesus. It was black with a white inset and attached to a large rosary hanging from the belt worn at the waist. It was modernised in 1966, keeping the basics of the original symbol in place.

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MacKillop

The Josephite Emblem, worn by the Sisters of St Joseph, is symbolic and traditional in its origin. The M is for Mary, the Mother of God. The three Js are for Jesus, Joseph and John the Baptist. Mary MacKillop had great devotion to John the Baptist - the one who came to prepare the way for Jesus. This monogram, formed in blue braid, was first worn by the early Sisters on the front of their brown habit.

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Prendiville House

The crest of Archbishop Prendiville shows his Irish heritage with the harp, his Australian home with the Southern Cross and Black Swans for Western Australia. The Gaelic football reminds us of his sporting skills and the cross tells us of his deep faith.

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Rice House

The crest of the congregation of Christian Brothers has many symbols. The Celtic lettering and tracery are symbolic of the congregation's Irish origins and the star is a symbol of enlightenment and guidance. The circle represents eternity and the open book indicates learning is to be brought to the young. The letters Alpha and Omega remind us that God is the beginning and the end of all truth. The motto 'Facere Et Docere' means 'to do and teach'









Athetics Carnival 2020
Athetics Carnival 2020
Athetics Carnival 2020
Athetics Carnival 2020
Athetics Carnival 2020
Athetics Carnival 2020